Autism, Academia, and Why Media Representation Matters

Earlier in the week, Scott Weingart had a brave, essay on being autistic in academic, published in Inside Higher Education. Admitting mental illness or neurodevelopmental disorder is dangerous, unless you’re a middle-class white man diagnosed on the autism spectrum. If you’re black and/or a woman, or if you have depression or anxiety, you may be … Continue ReadingAutism, Academia, and Why Media Representation Matters

More on Accessible Conferences: Pryal and “Reading Aloud”

Katie Rose Guest Pryal, one of my favorite writers on hidden disabilities, has produced some awesome work lately on accessibility. She was one of many people to write about the lack of disability content at the big Association of Writers and Writing Programs (AWP) conference, producing fabulous pieces about the nature of accessibility. Now she’s … Continue ReadingMore on Accessible Conferences: Pryal and “Reading Aloud”

Accessible Conferences – A good set of guidelines

Nice post here on Accessible Conferences. Highlights: Incorporating accessibility into conference organizing must begin at the earliest stages of conference planning, not least of all to ensure that accessibility is a central item in funding applications. Thus, you will notice that even our CFP for the conference provided a sketch of the accessibility provisions for … Continue ReadingAccessible Conferences – A good set of guidelines

Accommodations in Academia – Some positive models

As I wrote about the job discrimination ads last month for Al Jazeera America‚Äč, I kept thinking about the hashtag #ILookLikeAProfessor and Kelly J. Baker‚Äč’s work. My thesis is that the inadvertent part of this was based, at least in part, on people who had just never considered that a disabled person might be able … Continue ReadingAccommodations in Academia – Some positive models

Adventures in Rhetorical Brilliance: Black Law Students of Georgetown and Scalia

I’ve been writing about trigger warnings, political correctness, and safe space issues for almost two years now (starting with this CNN piece, but extending throughout my blog, including ‘trigger warnings are your friends.’). There are at least two different strains of critique of the notion of microaggressions on campus. One is from mostly male white semi-liberals who … Continue ReadingAdventures in Rhetorical Brilliance: Black Law Students of Georgetown and Scalia

Grab Your Balls and The Problem with Blind Peer Review

Men’s Rights Activists are a particular strain of misogynist who couch their hatred of women in appropriating a language of victimhood. As an avowed feminist, I have encountered them many times, including when I put a defense of feminism on a website haunted by MRAs, and hung around in the comments for a few days … Continue ReadingGrab Your Balls and The Problem with Blind Peer Review

The Chocolate Milk Mustache of the Corporatization of the University

From Vox, Julia Belluz has quite a story. The University of Maryland issued a press release about a new study on the effects of a single brand of chocolate milk on cognitive and motor skill tests in high school athletes. The story, as she documents, is that Fifth Quaker Fresh funded research, the scientists did … Continue ReadingThe Chocolate Milk Mustache of the Corporatization of the University

What Is The Good Life? – Scenes from a Dystopian Job Market

The lucky winner of this job will be in an excellent position to opine on the Good Life. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Florida invites applications for the position of lecturer to teach the Humanities Common Course, IUF 1000: What is the Good Life?, to begin August 16, 2016. As … Continue ReadingWhat Is The Good Life? – Scenes from a Dystopian Job Market